Unbearable Lightness: A Story of Loss and Gain

141 comments

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A couple weekends ago when I was feeling under the weather, I picked up the book Unbearable Lightness by Portia de Rossi.

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(Ok, ok I also bought a new mug…busted!! haha)

In Unbearable Lightness, Portia talks very candidly about her struggles with an eating disorder, being a ‘closet’ lesbian, and the pressure she felt from the modeling and acting world to have the perfect body. The book is beautifully written, heartfelt, and honest. I ended up reading the book cover to cover in one evening. It completely sucked me in and I found myself crying, smiling, or laughing right along with Portia. I commend her bravery for sharing her story in such an honest way. I know she will help many women.

My only small complaint was that Portia didn’t go into her recovery as much as I hoped she would. In just a small chapter at the end of the book, she talked about some of the things that helped her recover- such as horse-riding or her relationship with Ellen. I finished the book wanting to know much more about her recovery. I really hope that she writes a second book as a follow up!

I also think the book could be triggering for some people who are currently struggling with an eating disorder. Portia is very specific and detailed about numbers and behaviours while she was suffering. This book is definitely a read at your own risk. I personally was not triggered by the material, but if I had read this book 3 years ago, it would have been another story.

Given that it is Eating Disorder Awareness week in the US, I thought it would be a good time to share some of my favourite RECOVERY quotes from the book. The last chapter is so inspiring and I found myself highlighting much of what Portia wrote.

"Do I love myself the way I am? Yes. (Well, I’m working on it!) But that doesn’t mean I love my body just the way it is. People who recover from eating disorders can’t be expected to have higher standards than the rest of society, most of whom would like to alter a body part or two. The difference now is that I’m no longer willing to compromise my health to achieve that. I’m not even willing to compromise my happiness to achieve it, or for the thought of my thighs to take up valuable space in my mind. It’s just not that important.

“I’m very grateful for what [my body] does. I thank my thighs for being strong and allowing me to walk my dogs around my neighbourhood and ride my horses."

"I find that if I can concentrate on getting better at something, rather than getting fitter or looking better, I accomplish all three things- the latter two being happy by-products of the original goal.”

"The fact that I stopped restricting food made it less appealing. I began tasting food and listening to my internal nutritionist as it told me that I truly wanted to eat a crispy salad rather than fries. When it told me that fries were what I was craving, it said, ‘Eat as many as you want knowing that you can always have them again tomorrow.’ So I’d eat just a few or I’d rat the whole damn serving until I couldn’t eat anything else on my plate."

"I stopped weighing myself. I simply didn’t care about weight anymore because it was always a comfortable good weight for my body. As I listened to my internal nutritionist, I stopped wanting to eat eggs, meat, and dairy. While I have never felt more healthy and energized, the most important thing that happened to me when I stopped eating animals was a sense of connectedness. When I was suffering from an eating disorder, my life was solely about me. I was living through my ego. My decision not to eat animals anymore was paramount to my growth as a spiritual person. It made me feel like I was contributing to making the world better and that I was connected to everything around me. Healing comes from love. And loving every living thing in turn helps you love yourself."

"I made the mistake of thinking that what I look like is more important that who I am– that what I weigh is more important than what I think or what I do. I was ashamed of being gay, and so I only heard the voices that said that being gay is shameful."

"Ellen taught me to not care about other people’s opinions. She taught me to be truthful. She taught me to be free. I began to live my life in love and complete acceptance. For the first time I had truly accepted myself."

"I met Ellen when I was [at my heaviest] and she loved me. She didn’t see that I was heavy; she only saw the person inside. My two greatest fears, being fat and being gay, when realized, led to my greatest joy. It’s ironic, really, when all I’ve ever wanted is to be loved for my true self, and yet I tried so hard to present myself as anything other than who I am."

I get chills reading those quotes…many of them really ring true for me.

It is long overdue as women, we start embracing our bodies instead of holding them up to some unattainable ideal. A big part of the battle is learning how to re-frame our negative thoughts.

Instead of cursing my thighs, I now thank them for being strong, powerful, and for helping me run in races.

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For me, happiness and self-acceptance does not always come easy. The difference between now and then is that I am now willing to put in the effort if it leads me in a positive direction, rather than a negative one.

There is no ‘happiness finish line’ in my world. It’s an on-going effort requiring daily work, love, and attention. I know if I put that effort in each day, I will be in a good place.

Thankfully, I’ve never minded a good challenge.

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{ 141 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Laura February 23, 2011

I am actually reading this book right now! It’s a great perspective on “the otherside” of the modeling and acting industry, too, and makes me wonder how many other celebrities are as scared as she is going on set, on the red carpet, etc.

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2 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

I also thought that it was really interesting how she described the cast of Ally McBeal as being so closed and standoff-ish. It portrayed an image that was quite sad, but also very telling (the treadmills in the offices, no eating lunch together, etc)

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3 Baking 'n' Books February 23, 2011

Have you read “Hungry” by Crystal Renn??

That is a very interesting take from the modeling world.

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4 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

I haven’t read it, but I have heard it is a great book.

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5 megan @ blackberries for jam February 23, 2011

Thank you for this beautifully-written post. I’ve been contemplating reading Portia’s book for a while, and now I’m definitely going to download it to my kindle for my all-day flight next week.

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6 Jenny February 23, 2011

Thanks for sharing!

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7 amanda February 23, 2011

I read this book earlier in the year and I loved it as well. I originally picked it up just because I think she’s awesome (Arrested Development remains my favourite show ever) but I was so glad to read through the book. I completely agree with you that it could be triggering to someone in a vulnerable state with an eating disorder, but I admire her current attitude that you highlighted above where she says, “Eat as many as you want knowing that you can always have them again tomorrow.” Giving herself permission to eat the foods that she was afraid of was partially responsible for her healing … when she allowed herself to eat all the french fries she wanted, she found that she didn’t want them nearly as bad.

Thanks for posting this and reviewing the book – I think it’s an important read and I definitely recommend it.

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8 Ashley February 23, 2011

Happy Wednesday from Reno, Nevada Angela! Thanks for this post, because I’ve always had a nasty relationship with my body and my food– I was raised in a family that would go on “diets”– restricting and cutting out all sorts of foods which only ever led to well, disaster later. We were always focused on what was wrong with our bodies and not focusing on the power of our bodies and the positivity surrounding that idea. I’ve only recently begun renewing my relationship with food– since I work from home, I’ve been able to have time to prepare healthier meals, and other quicker ways to prepare those meals if I have to go into the office someday! Again, thank you for always sharing your thoughts! Have a great day!

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9 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

Thanks Ashley!

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10 lauren @ spiced plate February 23, 2011

thank you for this, both the review and quotes — powerful stuff, and so true.

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11 Allie (Live Laugh Eat) February 23, 2011

I read that book last month and literally could NOT put it down! I agree it can be a bit triggering but it showed me just how far I’ve come when I thought her ED habits/concerns were crazy and extreme. Isn’t it great to look back and realize how being healthy means being happy? I think the book ended too soon too. Hopefully that means book #2 is on the way.

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12 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

That is a great way to put it…the fact that I was not ‘triggered’ by it showed me how far I have come. It made me happy to be in a healthy place.

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13 Julie (A Case of the Runs) February 23, 2011

I LOVE Ellen, so by proxy Portia. I think I’d read this book at some point (once I’m done w/my dissertation and get myself a Kindle as a gift!). I’m glad she was able to come out of her illness and find happiness.

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14 AllieNic@ Frisky Lemon February 23, 2011

I read this book a few months ago and found it incredible– It was painful to read, but it made me so grateful for where I am today. I really appreciate that Portia took the time to share this very personal story– although it might be a trigger for some, it will also let people who have gone through similar situations know that they’re not alone.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts on this book!

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15 Megan (The Runner's Kitchen) February 23, 2011

I have this book on hold at the library – can’t wait to read it! Whenever I get down on myself for eating too much ice cream or having an imperfect (??) body, I remind myself of what this body can DO. It can run marathons, carry heavy shopping bags to my 3rd floor walk-up apartment, laugh, love, etc. Great post! Thanks for the quotes :)

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16 Anna @ Newlywed, Newly Veg February 23, 2011

I’ve been wanting to read that book!! So glad you enjoyed it– although I can see how it might be triggering for certain people.

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17 Allison @ Food For Healing February 23, 2011

so touching. the best stories are those recovery stories people tell. it shows really how strong someone is! it is not an easy thing to go through; been there, done that, and still struggle a lot of the days. But you learn from your mistakes, your accomplishments, and others.

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18 Valerie @ City|Life|Eats February 23, 2011

I have read several articles on this book and would love to read it, but I was afraid of how the book might trigger something in me. Thank you for the great review. I may give it a try in a few months.

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19 Marina February 23, 2011

I will read this book, but not yet, because I’m afraid I’m still not strong enough. Thank you Angela for this post, and for continuing to inspire me in my recovery and my path towards happy satisfied life.

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20 denise February 23, 2011

Thank you for such an honest post. I am 45 years old and can honestly say, I still don’t like my body. I am not overweight and my body has been strong enough to give me five beautiful children. Yet, after all these years, I still struggle with my body image. Thank goodness I have been blessed with a daughter, so in my effort to make her love herself, I am learning to do the same for me.

I enjoy your blog so much and admire that you have been wise enough to start this journey of self-love at such a young age. You are a wonderful inspiration for women of all ages!

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21 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

Thank you for your honesty Denise! You are certainly not alone…hopefully by talking about it, we can all help one another grow.

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22 Kathi February 23, 2011

Denise,

Like you I am 46 years old and have had trouble with loving my body for a long time. I have recently been told I have a eating disorder and I guess I knew something wasn’t quite right but was not quite ready to accept it. Angela blog has truly inspired me even at 46 it isn’t too late to start loving yourself one small step at a time.
Thank you so much for sharing it really help me today knowing that I am not along at my age.

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23 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

Totally agree ‘at 46 it isn’t too late to start loving yourself one small step at a time.’ it’s never too late. Thanks for the comment!

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24 Marit February 24, 2011

I am not overweight either, i’m “athletic” build albeit with a bit of a belly…. (yes… it’s my body-issue..).
I am 32 and although i absolutely HATE my loose belly-skin, I know it’s loose because i carried my daughter in there. She was my third pregnancy after i miscarried twice and when she was 18 months i had an ectopic pregnancy.
Now, when i look in the mirror and hate the loose skin and scars, i force myself to change perspective and I tell myself that a bit of loose skin is the price I’ve paid for the most wonderful precious girl on the planet!
And when my daughter hugs my belly and tells me she wishes her pillow was as soft as my belly (seriously… she does..), it does remind me that there are much more important things in the world than how you look…
My body image doesn’t seem like a big deal from that perspective.

Angela, Thank you so much for the bookreview. I’m on amazon right now…
I love Ellen. She is so natural in everything that she does. I’d love to have her as a friend!
And Portia… i was watching Ally McBeal back in the day and i could not imagine how come this beautiful perfect looking woman always looked so sad! I know her character was supposed to be a mean cow but somehiow she always came across as sad…

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25 Megan @ Healthy Hoggin' February 23, 2011

I read that book right after Christmas, and many of her struggles rang true for me, too! I was afraid it might be a trigger, as well, but fortunately that didn’t become an issue. I wish she had talked more about her recovery, too! I actually re-read the last part of her book again, because I wanted more! ;)

Thanks to her book, I’ve really been inspired to give up the idea of “dieting” in general– it’s done me NO GOOD up to this point, so I figured I should try some self-love for a change! In fact, I just enrolled in nutrition school so I can learn more about how to care for my body and “share the health” with others!

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26 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

I was thinking about re-reading the last chapter too. :)

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27 Lindsay @ The Reluctant Runner February 23, 2011

I spotted this book a few months ago and have been meaning to read it. It really is amazing how different life feels when you stop struggling against your body and start working with it. I’m working my hardest at accepting myself and doing things because I know they will be good for me mentally and physically, such as eating well and exercising. I’m also being more forgiving when I really want something indulgent, because it’s not often, and I eat it without judgement. Definitely knowing that you can have the fries makes them less appealing than if you tell yourself you can’t have them!

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28 Liz @ Tip Top Shape February 23, 2011

I wanted to read this book whenI first heard about it, but never actually went out to buy it. These quotes have renewed my interest. I think it’s so brave of her to write about her struggles. I don’t know if I would be able to after going through what she did.

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29 lisa February 23, 2011

I really enjoyed the quotes that you pulled out of the book. I don’t think that I’m at a place in my recovery process where I can read it yet, but I’m going to keep it on my book list for that time when I’m ready.

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30 Erin February 23, 2011

Thank you for this post! Angela, your blog gave me the courage to make the same change and know that there was hope on the other side. I am definitely seeing light at the end of the tunnel and I’m so grateful :)

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31 Stacie @ Imperfectly Healthy February 23, 2011

I feel like so many of the posts going up on all my favorite blogs today are there just for me. I am definitely struggling with self-acceptance this week (which I blogged about today) and on trying to keep myself going in a positive direction even though it’s REALLY hard right now. Thanks for always being an inspiration and for posting your review of this book. I’ve been wanting to read it ever since I saw Portia on Oprah talking about it.

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32 Elizabeth@The Sweet Life February 23, 2011

Good for her for sharing her story–it’s a powerful message!

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33 Lisa February 23, 2011

I’m happy that she’s sharing her story. I’ve always loved her as an actress and the fact that she can be open and honest about this stuff is wonderful. I remember reading a long time ago that she felt pressure on the Ally McBeal set to be super skinny. I’d love to read this book. THanks for the review!

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34 Amy February 23, 2011

I have never been heavy, but I remember vividly in dance class (ballet for 13 years) my teacher telling me not to wear a certain color of tights because it made my butt look jiggely. It stuck with me for years, it ultimately is why I quit dancing. It is amazing how as women we take one little comment and dwell on it. I am always aware of my comments, I never want my daughter to feel that way. Since becoming vegetarian last June, I did gain a little weight. I don’t know how much because I don’t weigh myself. My clothes fit and I am comfortable with who I am. The nice thing is that my husband loves my curves. He loves that I have a little weight on me. I see some women that are so skinny, no butt, no thighs not womanly at all and it makes me sad. I am thankful that I have my strong legs, thighs and rear end. I am a busy working mom and I need all that strength! Thanks for doing a review on this book – I think it is one that I will pass on, but I am glad that she is now in a good place!

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35 Lizzie February 23, 2011

Hey Angela:

My apologies for the totally unrelated comment on this post, but my husband sent me this, this morning and I thought you might be interested in a quick read: http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/02/22/how-to-make-oatmeal-wrong/?hp

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36 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

Interesting read, thanks!

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37 Andrea B. @ Vegvacious February 23, 2011

I haven’t read the book, but it’s something that I plan to read in the future. I love the quote “healing comes from love” – it seems like such a simple ‘no brainer’ but it’s not is it? This is a lovely and inspiring post.

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38 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

yea that one really hit home with me…she has a great way with words

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39 Jessica @ How Sweet It Is February 23, 2011

I read this book. It was SO hard for me to read. It made me physically ill at times. It really opened my eyes.

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40 Katie February 23, 2011

Wow. She pinpointed exactly what I try to tell others when I attempt to explain how becoming vegan helped me recover from bulimia. When people hear that this relation exists, they assume that I overcame an eating disorder simply by restricting my diet even further (which in their eyes is merely another eating disorder).

I find it really hard to explain that my recovery is because of the harmony that I made with myself and with the earth that I live in…it is because of this harmony that I have learned to truly listen to my body and enjoy food in a completely different way.

“Healing comes from love. And loving every living thing in turn helps you love yourself.” I know this sounds crazy, but I’ve been wanting a tattoo (in my mom’s handwriting) but was waiting for the perfect quote…one that just “clicked”. I think this may just be it.

Thank you so much for this post, Angela!
I’m going to have to read this book!

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41 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

I have had the same question when I decided to go vegan too. When I read Portia’s quote it was exactly what I had been trying to convey (but couldnt put into words) for such a long time.

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42 Andrea February 23, 2011

1) I just discovered your blog and it’s been amazing! I’ve struggled with bulimia in the past and it’s great to hear your story and read your inspiring posts.

2) I read Portia’s memoir when it came out. I had the same feelings that you did. Totally loved it and then the recovery part was completely glossed over. As someone who is single (and thankfully in a healthy place regarding my ED) I kept thinking that if I were in a bad ED place Portia’s book would not have been helpful. I am sure this was not her intention at all but it kind of reads like “I stopped going to therapy. I found Ellen. She’s amazing. Now I’m not sick anymore.”

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43 chelsey @ clean eating chelsey February 23, 2011

Great post I’ve been meaning to pick up that book!

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44 Caitlin February 23, 2011

Thank you for writing and sharing such a beautiful post, Angela! Definitely needed to read that today!

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45 Erin @ The Grass Skirt February 23, 2011

Awesome post, Angela. I read Portia’s book in January and it really impacted me. It was so sad to read some of her thoughts, and it was even sadder to be able to relate to some of them at one point in my life. I completely agree that she could have focused more on her recovery. She made it seem like her troubles disappeared in an instant, and I’m sure that was not the case at all. It would be nice to hear how long her road to recovery was and what she did to break the cycle of unhealthy thoughts and actions. I think that a lot of women who are suffering could have benefited from that information. Still, it was a beautiful book, and I applaud her for being so open. :)

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46 jenny February 23, 2011

I loved this post. made my eyes water. I am definitely struggling. I know that I’m beautiful and capable and interesting. I run, I draw, I ride motorcycles,I travel, I read, I cook, I love photography. I am a whole, complete, and interesting woman. so why do I bash myself so much? At certain times of the month why do I hate my body feeling heavier? Why do I feel the need to look like a sexed up bikini model? I have people who love me the way I am. I don’t want to waste my short time on this earth worrying about looks.

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47 Tiffany February 23, 2011

I read this book when it came out, and was disappointed. Like you, I wish she had gone more in depth with her immediate and continuing recovery. I thought she really glossed over that topic.

I will say that it is so nice to be able to read a self-portrait of someone living with E.D., understand what that person is feeling, relate to their thought processes, reflect back on your time with E.D., and be able to put the book down and walk away from that thought process! Makes me very proud of myself :)

The quotes are great! It is so important to appreciate what your body can do, rather than what it looks like. I find myself still reframing numerous thoughts daily. No, my arms aren’t big, they are strong, and they just lifted a mentally and physically handicapped girl onto the toilet during her work break. Without these arms she would be stuck at home, not fulfilling her individual dreams. These arms are awesome!! My thighs are awesome because they allow me to run fast, ride my bike as long as I want, and play with my dog. The fat on my butt is awesome because it lets me sitdown without pain!!!

It’s so sad how we women pick ourselves apart and fail to see the whole.

side note- Have you read any books about women in advertising/media? It really exposes this method of advertising women in parts…which in turn conditions women to view themselves in parts vs a complete whole. very sad!

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48 Jacquelynn February 23, 2011

I just got that book from the library the other day… I am going to start it today or tomorrow. I have heard such wonderful things about it, and I love her and Ellen. Does it talk about her becoming a vegan? So many people with eating disorders heal by adapting a vegan diet. I find that so interesting.

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49 Bronwyn February 23, 2011

Those are some of the best eating disorder recovery quotes I’ve read. They are truly what I need to hear right now. Or read I suppose. Maybe I’ll take a look at this book.

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50 Jaclyn Trecartin February 23, 2011

This sounds like an interesting read. I will have to check it out. I agree with your comment re: your thighs. Instead of being angry at myself for having thicker thighs (i.e. muscular and not stick-thin) I have learned to love them, as they allow me to be strong and run. Same goes for my hips.

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51 Ashley February 23, 2011

I love your mug! And thank you for being so inspiring and such a good role model for everyone

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52 Beach Bum Beauty February 23, 2011

I really struggle with myself and I keep reading pieces such as this post and know I need to take the next steps to change how I feel and what I do but I’m not sure where to start. It seems like an overwhelming task. I know it’s possible because so many people have overcome their own personal battles but I really don’t know where to begin…

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53 Alaina February 23, 2011

Love your new mug! That’s my mantra through life. :-)

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54 Heather February 23, 2011

Beautiful! Thank you for sharing!

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55 Laura @ Sprint 2 the Table February 23, 2011

You’ve definitely motivated me to put this on my Kindle. I love how she talks about Ellen helping her not care what other’s think – that mentality is perfectly embodied in Ellen’s dancing at the beginning of her show. :) Imagine if we started every DAY like that?!

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56 Katy (The Singing Runner) February 23, 2011

Thank you for this review. I would love to read the book eventually, but I’m not sure if it would be a little too soon for me right now. Eventually when I know that I am strong enough to know that it won’t trigger me, I will read it. :D

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57 Angela @ Eat Spin Run Repeat February 23, 2011

I’ve not heard of this book up until now (which probably comes as a shock because judging by these comments, it looks like everyone else has!!) but I really like the pieces you pulled from it. I 100% agree with you when you say that it’s how we frame negative thoughts that counts. Once again, even though I didn’t know you back then, I admire you for how far you’ve come. :)

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58 Amber K February 23, 2011

This was a great blog. While I have never had an eating disorder I tend to read books like this because I do think bad thoughts about my body much more often than I should. I try to turn the negative thoughts into positive ones, and I really think it helps.

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59 Katie February 23, 2011

I love reading book reviews, as I am a HUGE bookworm. I have heard that she wrrote a book and I really really want to read it. Can’t wait now! Thanks for the review.

I think self-acceptance is hard for everyone.

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60 CathyK February 23, 2011

thanks for sharing your thoughts and the quotes that meant something to you, angela. i appreciate hearing your opinion.
i read this one when it first came out and finished in a couple of days (ie quickly!). i, too, hope for a followup book.

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61 Melomeals: Vegan for $3.33 a Day February 23, 2011

Wonderful review. I loved the book as well and hope she writes a second one more focused on her recovery.

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62 melissa February 23, 2011

great post. You always look amazing when running!

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63 Lara February 23, 2011

i was complaining of my runner’s thighs to my father and he called me thunder thighs (he was joking but doesn’t really understand how the eating disorder stays with me) then i saw this quote in a runner’s world article, “Runners know how to rank their body parts. Most vulnerable? Knees, for sure. Most tortured? Feet. We’ve got the blisters and black toenails to prove it. Most powerful? When it comes to speed, endurance, and the diesel that gets us uphill, downhill, and everywhere in between, most of us would find it hard to credit anything other than our thighs.”

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64 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

That is a great quote :) Thanks for sharing! yay strong thighs!

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65 Coco February 23, 2011

I loved Portia’s book so so much. But I do agree with you–the final chapter seemed a bit “rushed”, and I would have loved to hear more about her recovery.

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66 Halley (Blunder Construction) February 23, 2011

I have been wanting to read this book since it first came out, maybe I will start it after I finish my current read: The 48 Laws of Power – it has shed a new light on some of my views and perceptions of things other that weight and health. It’s amazing how much of an impression books can make. I feel the change happening, sometimes, as I turn each page!

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67 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

That book sounds interesting!

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68 Clare @ Fitting It All In February 23, 2011

Beautiful post. I’ve been curious about Portia’s book and whether or not it would good for me to read. I think I’ll read a bit of it at the store before I buy it. She sounds very wise.

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69 Beth @ DiningAndDishing February 23, 2011

I’m so glad you brought this up Anglea! I saw Portia on Ellen’s show the other day and really wanted to read her book – then totally forgot. I’m glad to see you enjoyed it – it’ll be my next read for sure :).

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70 Crystal February 23, 2011

Thank you so much for giving a little review on this book. I have heard about it and wasn’t sure if it was worth reading but now I am definitely going to purchase this book.

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71 Lily February 23, 2011

Hi, Angela,

I’ve been an Oh She Glows lurker for a long time, but I’ve never actually commented. So let me preface by saying how much I love your blog. You seem to be a genuinely lovely person.

I recently read Unbearable Lightness, too, and the excerpt you quote in this post really struck a profound chord in me, as well. I felt as if I could have written parts of it. I was wondering, have you ever read The Yoga of Eating by Charles Eistenstein? It’s out of print, which so sad, because it is a true life-changer. Knowing that you enjoyed de Rossi’s book and that you’ve had food struggles–like most of us women, I imagine–I STRONGLY recommend that you get your hands on this book. It looks at food and eating and life from a very holistic perspective. It is profoundly brilliant and makes SO much sense. I honestly can’t say enough good things about it. I got my copy from BookPeople online. http://www.bookpeople.com/book/9780967089720. Pardon the seemingly hyperbolic analogy, but it’s almost akin to a religious text–it’s the type of book that you always want to have within reach. I have no doubt that many of its messages would resonate with you.

Thank you for being such an inspiration.

Take Care,
Lily

P.S. Your double-chocolate-torte is DIVINE.

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72 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

Hey Lily, Thanks for the recommendation! I will try and find that book. It sounds great.

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73 Jess@atasteofconfidence February 23, 2011

Sounds like an amazing and inspiring book !I love the quote about still not being happy with one’s body, but not wanting to sacrifice for anything because it just isn’t worth it.

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74 Liza Jane February 23, 2011

I really loved this book and have now read it twice since purchasing it. Having recovered from anorexia years ago I identified with a lot of what was in the book. Honestly, I’m glad that she didn’t spend all that much time talking about her recovery, because I feel like she focused in the book on her many ups and downs that got her on the final road to getting healthy, which can be half the battle.

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75 Nic February 23, 2011

I recently purchased the book too!! :D
And can hardly put it down! But at the same time I don’t want it to end!
I really love it! And it was really eye opening!
I believe this book will help many people!! To know one is not alone!
Might it be with their eating disorder or being gay!
Thanks for writing about it! <3

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76 my little celebration February 23, 2011

That’s a great story, Angela. Thanks for sharing that outtake from the book. Even though I never technically had an eating disorder, my journey to health has been just that: a journey, filled with ups and downs. And thigh-cursing was a part of that.

Thanks for the dose of healthy perspective. I needed it.

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77 Samantha @ Health, Happiness & Skinny Jeans February 23, 2011

I really enjoyed the book although some of her descriptions made me physically uncomfortable in my own skin. I have dealt with body image issues over the years but never to such an extreme and it broke my heart to think that there are woman (and men) out there suffering, physically, mentally and emotionally, from such a devastating illness. I truly hope that Portia’s story inspires others to seek help and begin their own journey towards recovery.

My only concern with the book is that I fear it could trigger people with a history of disordered eating as it almost outlines, step by step, her restrictive eating and extreme exercise compulsion.

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78 Samantha @ Health, Happiness & Skinny Jeans February 23, 2011

Also, may I recommend “Wasted” by Marya Hornbacher. It is another beuatifully written memior of someone living with (and tortured by) both Anorexia and Bulimia. It really resonated with me because is delves into the truly dark sides of this issue.

http://maryahornbacher.com

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79 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

Yes I have read Wasted too. Unfortunately though, at the time it was more of a trigger for me than anything. I think it would be interesting to read it now that I am in a better place.

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80 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

I agree, that is why I wished that the recovery chapter had more weight…50-50 would have been perfect.

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81 Jenna February 25, 2011

Read “Insatiable” by Erica Rivers.

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82 LC February 23, 2011

This book sounds amazing. Just reading the quotes reminds me of how i felt for a long time suffering with my eating disorder. I am still recovering with good days and some bad. Working on total acceptance is hard and determining work that I will keep working at every day. This is a disease that will not beat me, but i will beat it! Thank you for this website Angela. You have helped me in more ways than you may know. I also remember one post you were mentioning Sunny Hills Bakery bread. I had been wanting to try it, anf finally did. Iwas curious to know if you had tried their Chia bread? It is gluten free and probably the best bread I have ever tasted! 6grams of fibre per slice too! If you have not tried it, I highly recommend that you do:) Cheers!

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83 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

Thanks for your kinds words :) That is awesome how much progress you have made!
I have not tried the chia bread yet, but I will put it on my list for sure.

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84 Starla Garcia February 23, 2011

i had been checking your website everyday in hope of finding a new daily glow update, and here it is!
i absolutely love it and that you reviewed Portia’s book. i saw that it had come out one morningwhile I was workigng out & watching GMA. all the quotes that you have selected about having an ED and re-framing the negatives is exactly what i have been trying to do lately with my own ED. it is a struggle, but day by day i feel myself getting stronger and slowly am more able to push it away. thanks for sharing & im glad you give a “read at your own risk” heads up because i was wondering about and hping it would kind of help me also deal with my recovery. I will be sure to read it when I am TRULY ready.
this weekend is a big race for our university track team, and i am running the 5k on friday, so i need all of the positive thoughts i can get to break 18 minutes! wish me luck!
btw, how is your training going?

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85 Starla Garcia February 23, 2011

i had been checking your website everyday in hope of finding a new daily glow update, and here it is!
i absolutely love it and that you reviewed Portia’s book. i saw that it had come out one morningwhile I was workigng out & watching GMA. all the quotes that you have selected about having an ED and re-framing the negatives is exactly what i have been trying to do lately with my own ED. it is a struggle, but day by day i feel myself getting stronger and slowly am more able to push it away. thanks for sharing & im glad you give a “read at your own risk” heads up because i was wondering about and h0ping it would kind of help me also deal with my recovery. I will be sure to read it when I am TRULY ready.
this weekend is a big race for our university track team, and i am running the 5k on friday, so i need all of the positive thoughts i can get to break 18 minutes! wish me luck!
btw, how is your training going?

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86 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

Goodluck! Sub 18 is SUPER fast!

My training is going fairly well. I’m keeping up with my mileage and long runs. I can’t WAIT to get outside again though.

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87 Laura @ prettylittlewords February 23, 2011

Such a wonderful post! I have read many little tidbits about Portia’s book here and there, so it’s nice to see another :) She’s lovely!

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88 kaila @ healthy helper! February 23, 2011

WELL, aside from making me smile from ear to ear, you have totally convinced me to read this book! It sounds amazingly honest and inspirational….just like you :)!!! Thank you for continually writing such thought provoking, genuine posts! Keep up the awesome work!

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89 Averie (LoveVeggiesAndYoga) February 23, 2011

I have heard great things about Portia’s book…but have never read it. I will put it on my to-read list. Along with the 989876 books on it that I really want to read!

I think the quotes that you showcased ring true for so many women. Not just women with diagnosed or “classic” ED’s, but for many women. I think so many women struggle with self-acceptance, feeling like we are good enough on our own, loving ourselves for who we are today, in the present moment, for just being happy to be alive…I think many women (people) struggle with these things, and throw in an ED, and it’s all just compounded.

I love your daily Glow series. So uplifting.

Thank you, Angela, for sharing these wonderful posts :)

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90 kate@ahealthypassion February 23, 2011

What an inspirational story I had no idea she struggled with so much it takes a lot of courage to expose yourself to the world like that and I have respect for her for doing so. She has helped a lot of women im sure!

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91 Katie February 23, 2011

Angela, this was beautiful. Thank you for posting this. I want to run out and buy her book now!

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92 Ellie@fitforthesoul February 23, 2011

Hi Angela! I just wanted to hopefully encourage you saying that you’re a beautiful woman inside and out! I’m not just flattering you, and I’m not sure if you believe in prayer–but I pray that you will continue to find that everlasting joy in your spirit as you keep on going! If I may share, God is my only source of joy and I could never go back :D You’re amazing and inspire many women out there. You have great things in store for you Ange! Keep on rockin’

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93 Carly February 23, 2011

I forced myself to read the book slowly because I didn’t want it to be over. I thought it was beautifully written, and I agree if I had read it 2 years ago I would have been incredibly triggered.
Another good book about Eating Disorders (to spread the word for awareness week!) is Stick Figure by Lori Gottlieb. This book played a large part in my recovery.

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94 Holly @ Couch Potato Athlete February 23, 2011

I want to read this book but I’m afraid I’ll find it triggering in some way — maybe in a year or two I’ll feel comfortable picking it up.

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95 Lauren February 23, 2011

I loved this book. I read it faster than anything I’ve read in a long time. I agree that it is definitely “read at your own risk” material but it was so raw and passionate. Truly a beautiful book and jaw dropping honesty.

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96 Ashlee February 23, 2011

Great post! I’ve been reading your blog for a while now (LOVE THE RECIPES!) but have yet to comment.

This book was fantastic – like may commenters, I struggled all through high school and still do with healthful eating, and I found that Portia’s decriptions of her behaviors when she was in the throes of her disorder really rang true. I chose this book for my upcoming bookclub, (yeah, I’m that geeky), and we meet in a month, so I’m very interested to see what all my girlfriends have to say. I think at the end of the day, most women can identify with Portia’s story on some level, and the manner in which she put it out there was so poignant.

Thank you so much for bringing attention to this superb story (and issue!), and please keep up with the amazing posts, recipes and general musings. Cheers :)

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97 Michelle February 23, 2011

Wow. This totally struck a chord with me. That last paragraph she wrote gave me major chills. I’ve gone through much of what you have, and now, thankfully, I’ve never been happier. Thank you for always bringing up such relevant and honest conversations here on your blog. I’d say the couple years I’ve read your blog has helped me get to where I am now!

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98 Candy (Healthy in Candy Land) February 23, 2011

Thank you for sharing your thoughts on this. Having never had an eating disorder I was surprised at how much those quotes and your thoughts resonated with me. Wow. Total happiness is a journey for me as well, and each day brings me one step closer.

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99 Annette @ EnjoyYOURHealthyLife February 23, 2011

Beautiful post Angela. I might end up reading this now because it wouldn’t trigger me (it would have a few months/year back!!) Thanks for the honesty!

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100 Ruthie Martin February 23, 2011

Thank you for this lovely, honest and inspirational post. It is funny because I’ve just been having one of those weeks where I’ve been feeling, you know, just ugh about my body. Reading your post has reminded me of how much freedom my body allows me these days. Time was I could barely walk up the stairs and now I’m training for a marathon and I’m realising I’d much rather have running legs than bony ones!
Also I love that quote on your new mug! And one more thing, your blog is FANTASTIC, the recipes are brilliant and your writing is great, so thanks!

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101 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

Im sorry to hear you are having one of those weeks…I hope it goes better for you! :) Always remember that we are more hard on our bodies than anyone else would ever be!!

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102 Molly February 23, 2011

Wonderful review of the book. Here’s another quote about her recovery.

“I watched her eat pasta, candy, ice cream, and cheese. I watched her dip her bread in olive oil and wash it down with Coke- real Coke, not diet- while I ate dry salads with no dressing and sipped iced tea. … After initially dismissing her eating habits as a result of her just being one of those lucky people who can eat whatever they want and stay thin, it suddenly occurred to me that maybe people who stay thin are the people who eat whatever they want. … All I did all my life was diet and gain the weight back. Therefore, I concluded that the diets didn’t work. I decided to never diet again. After that day, instead of watching her eat, I joined in. I ate whatever she ate. We cooked meals together and loaded our plates with pasta. We ate ice cream. Because I knew I could eat it again the next day if i wanted to. I stopped wanting in excess. If it was going to be available to me anytime, why eat like it was the last meal?”

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103 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

that is a great one too :)

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104 Melissa @ Be Not Simply Good February 23, 2011

I’m big on seeing our bodies for what they can do rather than what they look like. I’m not going to lie; there are appearance things about my body that I like or dislike, but what I *value* about my body is what it has done and what it can do. This attitude really came into focus for me after I had my first child, but it’s true for everyone. What an amazing creation a person is.

Love your new mug. I’m a fan of Thoreau. :)

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105 Freya February 23, 2011

I totally just printed those quotations out – SO applicable to me right now.

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106 liv February 23, 2011

I’m really glad you wrote this book because I noticed myself slipping back into old habits while reading it over a few days especially since the way she writes sounded so similar to the voice that used to be in my head (though I was thankfully never as extreme as she was). I’m glad I finished the book because that last chapter, though I agree way too short, did help in bringing me back to reality and then some. After finishing the book I really hoped somebody would make some kind of public announcement that it could be potentially triggering because I think if I hadn’t been in the place I am right now with my recovery it would’ve thrown me right back in. Portia was well-intentioned in writing the memoir (and I think it’s great for people who have recovered or for those close to someone with an ED and trying to understand them) but it needs some kind of warning label on it in my opinion.

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107 Jenn from Much to My Delight February 23, 2011

This is a really great post. I’ve been wanting to read that book (could there be a more perfect title for a book about eating disorders?).

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108 Katelyn @ Chef Katelyn February 23, 2011

I purchased this book a while back and it was still a bit triggering (unfortunately), so I am waiting a bit to finish reading it. But those were the best quotes of the book, the deepest, and ring true for myself as well. Portia is absolutely inspirational, and her struggle speaks to the issues found by so many girls – they do not even realize it is a “disorder”. Thank you for this post, Ang! I currently have a Mission: I Feel Pretty movement going on on my bloggy, and I would love it if you would mention it! It has so much to do with disordered eating struggles, and I feel like it could help so many women!

http://chefkatelyn.wordpress.com/mission-i-feel-pretty/

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109 Nour A February 23, 2011

I want to read this book!! Thanks for your thoughts :)

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110 Joey February 23, 2011

I read this book shortly after it came out and really enjoyed it…for the most part. I agree the end/recovery portion of the book was sparser than I would have liked. After reading the book, I pretty much chatted with everyone who would listen about how I felt about the book. I don’t believe I’ve ever had an eating disorder, but I do know I can definitely relate to quite a bit of what she spoke of in the book. I think many people can.

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111 Cindy February 23, 2011

I just finished reading this book and couldn’t put it down. While not having bulimia or anorexia, I definitely know I’ve suffered from disordered eating and identified with a lot of behaviours and thought patterns that Portia had…the compulsive calorie counting, hating to look at myself in the mirror…it was interesting to see really how close I came. I too, like you look at my body so differently now…I like that I’m athletic and strong and have muscles!

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112 Jocelyn (formerly jocelyn eats fresh) February 23, 2011

Hey Angela… I have really been struggling for the past few months.and i needed to read this! I think I will look for this book :)

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113 Lily @ Lily's Health Pad February 23, 2011

I’m actually reading this book right now. I’m certainly enjoying it. What I find more interesting than her eating disorder is her behind the scenes look at what life as a star is like. So interesting that she was so talented and successful yet so sad.

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114 Erin February 23, 2011

omg I did a blog post on the same thing!!!! about a month ago. I could not put this book down. I loved it and hated it… I loved it because it totally described the insanity that you can get while deep in the disease and it explains it in a way that for those who didnt suffer from the disease they can get a real glimpse. I hated it because for a bit i kind of sunk into the deepness of the disease again, not going back into it but the raw emotions came back. But it was refreshing because it was a hard reminder of where I DO NOT want to ever be again!!!! Glad you posted on this as well, I am definitely going to re-read the book again :-)

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115 Kath (My Funny Little Life) February 23, 2011

Thank you for sharing this! I’ve heard a lot about this book lately, so I was interested in learning more about it.

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116 Lisa February 23, 2011

::lurker comes out:::
I just read this book on Sunday. Yup, the whole thing, start to finish. On Sunday. I absolutely loved it (although do wish she chronicled some of her recovery- while recovery is intensely personal, it’s important to reiterate that it’s not always pretty and doesn’t always feel good.) So many “experts” (doc, psychologists, therapists, etc) do say that an ED is something you have to live with, and they pass that down to their patients- SO WRONG. I had a life with my eating disorder 8 years ago and I can confidentaly say I am 100% recovered.

The saddest thing for me, with Portia’s book, wasn’t about her eating disorder- it was her intense self-hatred for being gay. Perhaps I was raised very liberally, and live in a liberal area, but it makes me SO SAD and feel such pain for homosexuals who don’t feel that they are “right” or that their sexual preference is “wrong”. I guess I live in a bubble where it doesn’t matter to me what sexual orientation people are- the fact that she had such intense self hatred about being gay not so long out really upsets me- I wish we were past all of this homophobia.

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117 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

I too thought that was so sad, especially when her mom told her to hide it from her family.

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118 Angie February 23, 2011

I just love how inspiring you are! I agree that there is no happiness finish like, we should always strive to do more, get stronger and become better people in this world! Just love your posts Angela! I’m Angie and I have a blog of my own. I’ve tried your pumpkin butter recipes and pumpkin bread (the bread where you put the pumpkin butter inside the loaf…genius by the way!) It’s nice to “meet” ya!

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119 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 23, 2011

heeeeeyaaaaaaaa!

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120 SaraD February 23, 2011

I read this book a few months ago. As someone who struggles with health and wellness from the opposite enf of the spectrum (obesity) I was amazed at how the inner workings of our minds were still so similar. She did speak quite candidly about her habits and I thought the same thing about triggers for those who are battling an ED.

I also have that same mug! It makes me smile whenever I drink from it. :)

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121 Rebecca February 23, 2011

I’m so comforted by the fact that you and others recognized the potential for the book to be a trigger. While I very much enjoyed reading the book and being able to identify with someone so closely, it did trigger me. I kept thinking, “what’s wrong with me that I’m reading this inspiring story about survival and victory and it’s making me want to take 3 steps back?”. In the end, I’m glad that I read the book because the short part about her recovery was encouraging. With a background in clinical psychology, I know all about the clinical side of treatment, but nothing compares to hearing someone who has recovered tell you about the process. I’m comforted to know I’m not the only one who had a mixed response, though.

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122 JenATX February 23, 2011

Yep, I feel ya on this one. When Portia spoke on the Ellen show about how she posted her goal weight on her walls & then would take down those weights once she achieved them I was actually jealous of her self determination. And then I thought “oh my gosh, how awful that I’m jealous of this woman when she was suffering.” I think it just goes to show how restriction & weight loss is about so much more than food.

Anyway, thanks Angela. I love the part at the end about happiness having no finish line. There probably won’t ever be some day that I’m completely OK with everything but its comforting to know that it doesnt have to be :)

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123 Richelle February 23, 2011

Great post, I love it when you write abou this topic. Thanks.

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124 Jen February 23, 2011

I had my first support group for people with BED and bulimia. I am tired of having disordered eating and binging, feeling bad, binging some more, feeling bad. I need to get off of this cycle and away from the control the scale has over my life. Thanks for inspiring me.

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125 Erin @ WholesomeRD February 23, 2011

Thanks for sharing! So inspiring! :)

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126 Jolene (www.everydayfoodie.ca) February 23, 2011

I am reading the book right now!! About half way through :-)

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127 Casey Thomas February 24, 2011

I’ve been wanting to read this book for a long while but just haven;t picked it up yet. Thank you for sharing so much of it. I had tears reading about Portia’s journey.

I found becoming a vegan to be a hue part of my healing from emotional and disordered eating. That connection with a bigger meaning and seeing food on a more spiritual level was a huge element in my own healing.

Thanks Angela!

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128 Lynna February 24, 2011

“The difference between now and then is that I am now willing to put in the effort if it leads me in a positive direction, rather than a negative one.” I love how you said this at the end of the post. I’ve been feeling the same way lately but couldn’t quite articulate it (I’ve struggled with depression and binge eating in the past). While I still have things to work on, the way I respond to bad feelings now is much more positive than before. It’s so important to take action and make a positive choice when you’re feeling down (i.e. going to the gym, talking to a friend, writing etc.)– for me, that’s the best way to stop negativity in its tracks. Thanks for this post!

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129 Ryan @ Aloha Appetite February 24, 2011

I love the statement about cursing the thighs and then thanking them; my thoughts exactly. Amazing how transformations come about!

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130 Juli February 24, 2011

Beautiful post, Angela. Just beautiful.

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131 Allison February 24, 2011

I love your closing comment & had to share it… “There is no ‘happiness finish line’ in my world. It’s an on-going effort requiring daily work, love, and attention. I know if I put that effort in each day, I will be in a good place.”

Thanks for your inspiration.

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132 JT February 24, 2011

I have not read the book. I found your blog last year and have been an avid follower ever since. I was very moved by your story but it devastates me everyday to see some of the beautiful souls who also follow your blog and HOW MANY suffer with an eating disorder. WOW! I had no idea there were so so so many out there. I have two daughters and I am now so so scared for them to grow up surrounded by this fear and the perception of perfection.
For all of you out there, you are so worthy of life…and a happy, healthy one at that. You are all beautiful and are all Creators perfection at this exact moment (and every other moment as well). Bless your hearts! Love yourself, every body part and every flaw are your perfection!!!!

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133 Leah February 24, 2011

Did you see Portia on Oprah when she was discussing this book? What a POWERFUL show. At one point she talked about her mother on Christmas Day and how she said to her “I accept you for who you are”…because obviously she hid that she was gay and had an eating disorder. That crushed me and made me pick up Sophie off the floor from where she was playing and I just hugged her. I cannot imagine Sophie ever feeling that she would have to hide something from me like that. I hope she grows up knowing that I accept her no matter what. From the excerpts that were read on the show it sounds like quite the book. I learned so much about Portia from that show. I loved how at the end she said that a key to her recovery was not restricting anything from her diet and allowing herself as much as she wants of anything. She believes that the more you allow yourself the less you want it and the more you just listen to your body. Eventually everything evens out.

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134 E February 24, 2011

This is so wonderful. I’m in recovery for an eating disorder (bulimia) and lately have been feeling overwhelmed by the fact that while my physical symptoms have more or less stopped, I am going to have to mentally wrestle with food and weight every day for a long, long time. I love your blog because it’s empowering to see what a happy eater you have become post-ED, but it’s also reassuring in a way to know that even someone as seemingly grounded as you are now still considers it a daily process. I think reframing this struggle in my mind from a life sentence of mental anguish to a daily opportunity to grow in my commitment to health and happiness will help me keep in a positive frame of mind about my recovery and prevent me from falling off the wagon. Definitely considering making some inspirational signs of these quotes for my bedroom walls!

Would you say the book is more or less triggering than Marya Hornbacher’s Wasted (if you’ve read it)? I thought that book was brilliant, and particularly helpful to hand to my family and say “This is what I’m going through,” but it sent me into a two-week-long tailspin the last time I read it (at a point several months into recovery when I thought I could handle revisiting the material). I really want to read Portia’s book, but I’m not itching to relive the Wasted experience. Any insight would be so very much appreciated.

Thank you for always being so candid about your experience! I look forward to the day I feel brave and secure enough to blog about my own eating disorder and recovery. For now though, I continue to lurk behind my quasi-anonymous initial.

x
E

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135 E February 24, 2011

This is so wonderful. I’m in recovery for an eating disorder (bulimia) and lately have been feeling overwhelmed by the fact that while my physical symptoms have more or less stopped, I am going to have to mentally wrestle with food and weight every day for a long, long time. I love your blog because it’s empowering to see what a happy eater you have become post-ED, but it’s also reassuring in a way to know that even someone as seemingly grounded as you are now still considers it a daily process. I think reframing this struggle in my mind from a life sentence of mental anguish to a daily opportunity to grow in my commitment to health and happiness will help me keep in a positive frame of mind about my recovery and prevent me from falling off the wagon. Definitely considering making some inspirational signs of these quotes for my bedroom walls!

Would you say the book is more or less triggering than Marya Hornbacher’s Wasted (if you’ve read it)? I thought that book was brilliant, and particularly helpful to hand to my family and say “This is what I’m going through,” but it sent me into a two-week-long tailspin the last time I read it (at a point several months into recovery when I thought I could handle revisiting the material). I really want to read Portia’s book, but I’m not itching to relive the Wasted experience. Any insight would be so very much appreciated.

Thank you for always being so candid about your experience! I look forward to the day I feel brave and secure enough to blog about my own eating disorder and recovery. For now though, I continue to lurk behind my quasi-anonymous initial.

x
E

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136 Angela (Oh She Glows) February 24, 2011

I would say that it is on par with Wasted…Portia holds NOTHING back in the book. I commend her for that, but at the same time, one should take caution when reading it. All the best, Ange :)

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137 Jenna February 25, 2011

I think “Wasted” is a separate genre on its own. “Wasted” really chronicles the madness, the depression, the depth…the true depth of one who not only engages in ED like behaviors, but also cutting, manic behaviors, etc…If you’ve read her other book “Madness”, you’ll see this girl faced (faces?) deep challenges.
Much different from Portia’s story altogether…very different since Portia’s has a lot to do with modelling, hollywood, being skinny, etc…of course, it stems from her insecurities, etc…but completely different in my eye.
That’s the thing: I see you and so many others go on and run and run and thrive in life. I’ve ruined my body. I’m done. More than just an eating thing; its a deep, deep darkness. I find these things to be completely separate. Together. But individual experiences are so different —like no one could ever know what its like for me daily to perservere (just as I would never be able to know what another lives with).

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138 Natalia - a side of simple February 24, 2011

Great review, Angela. This is such an important and delicate topic, and I really appreciate how you’ve articulated your thoughts and perspective, as well as chosen ideal quotes from the book. I think I’m definitely going to put this on my reading list!
As always, thanks for sharing your glow :)

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139 Paulina (One Smile Ahead) February 24, 2011

I would love to read this book, but to be honest I’m not really sure if I’m ready for it yet. I think I need something which would cover recovery more.. Do you have any suggestions? :] It’s such a delicate topic and I really admire you for talking about it so openly. Thank you for all the everyday inspirations!

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140 Dori February 24, 2011

Thank you for this wonderful review. I wanted to read this book, but now I absolutely can’t wait to go out and get it. I just finished Wasted by Marya Hornbacher, have you read? It is very intense and would be very triggering for those who have suffered, but it was an amazingly honest account of her eating disorders.

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141 Aska March 23, 2011

Hi Angela,
Have you read the book “Eating in the Light of the Moon”? My counselor recommended it to me and I’ve been awed and inspired by every chapter of the book so far. It’s a great way to discover ways to reconnect with yourself. If you feel like picking up another book, I definitely recommend it! Thank you again for being who you are.

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